The Past and The Curious: A History Podcast for Kids and Families

Mick Sullivan

About

A History Podcast for Kids! Parents love us, Teachers love us, and most importantly, kids do too!
History can be amazing, inspiring and relevant to anyone. We love to share the stories of Spies, funny foods, George Washington's foibles, early advancements in cartooning and ballooning and much more! A professional music score and important songs accompany nearly every themed episode. Proud Kids Listen Member @pastandcurious

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88 episodes

Underwear Chronicles Eleven: John Wesley Powell

A scientist who lost his arm in the American Civil War wants to conquer The Grand Canyon. He needs a life-saving assist from his friends underwear. From the Upcoming Book "I See Lincoln's Underpants" due in the winter of 2022-23.

15m
Sep 19
Episode 70: Matthew Henson and Some Bananas

Slipping on banana peels was really a thing! Even Theodore Roosevelt got involved! Also, Black explorer Matthew Henson was quite possibly the first man to step on the North Pole. He also crossed paths with Mr. Roosevelt.

30m
Aug 30
Underwear Chronicles Ten: Queen Victoria

From Mick's upcoming book (end of 2022) "I See Lincoln's Underpants," this chapter focuses on Queen Victoria's life, preferred underwear, and also a pesky boy who takes to breaking and entering in Buckingham Palace.

16m
Aug 17
Episode 69 Sled Dogs (A Mashup Special)

A special mashup with our friends from Cool Facts About Animals. Mick tells the tale of the Great Serum Run of 1925 in two parts. When a Diphtheria epidemic threatens the small and far-off town of Nome Alaska, the only hope to get medicine to the sick is dogs. Many help, but two Siberian Huskies named Togo and Balto are most remembered by history. In between part one and part two of the story, the crew from Cool Facts About Animals shares ten interesting facts about sled dogs.

38m
Jul 30
Underwear Chronicles Nine: Otzi the Iceman

Who knew an ancient man frozen in his underwear could trigger international conflict? Otzi's accidental discovery was quite a find for science, and many are grateful that a glacier gobbled him up thousands of years ago!

13m
Jul 13
Episode 68: Lost And Found

Two kids, at two time and two places, find two remarkable things. One starts the first Gold Rush in America and the other leads to a Cold War spy ring! The stories of Conrad Reed and Jimmy Bozart - and more!

28m
Jun 29
Underwear Chronicles Eight: Amelia Bloomer

Despite being the namesake of an article of clothing that we commonly think of as underwear, Amelia Bloomer did not invent bloomers. To further the cause of Women’s Rights and to fight for the right to vote (in addition to prohibition), Amelia Bloomer ran a newspaper called The Lily.  When one of her friends showed up for a visit in a new outfit one day, history was made. Tired of the restrictive and oppressive clothing women were expected to wear in the 1800s, Amelia fell head over heels for the “tunic and pantalette combo,” as it was known. When she published the instructions to make them in The Lily, her subscriptions went through the roof.   Soon, the knee-length skirt and leg coverings underneath allowed for a new range of motion and freedom for women all over. One of the most remarkable things this allowed women to do was ride bicycles, which Susan B Anthony herself said, did “more to emancipate women than any one thing in the world.” Bloomers didn’t lead directly to the 19th Amendment, but the underwear played a strong supporting role.

15m
Jun 16
Underwear Chronicles Seven: Annette Kellerman

Annette Kellerman was a swimmer from Australia who rose to stardom for her speed and grace, but also changed the world of swimsuits. She once performed in front of England's Royal family, thanks to some clever underwear re-engineering.

17m
May 29
Episode 67: Violet Jessop, The Effie Afton, and more Shipwrecks

Violet Jessop survived not one, not two, but three shipwrecks involving White Star Line's incredible Olympic-class ships, including the Titanic. The Effie Afton was not so lucky. This steamboat was part of the struggle between railroads and riverboats, and she crashed into the only bridge on the Mississippi River, two weeks after it opened.

31m
Apr 29
Underwear Chronicles Six: Charles Lee

Charles Lee was George Washington's "Frenemy," and his duplicitous behavior got him caught with his pants down.

16m
Apr 19
Episode 66: Weather Wonders

Tetsuya "Ted" Fujita played an important role in understanding the impact of the atomic bombs of WWII. He brought that knowledge to America and applied it to understanding, and protecting people from, tornados. Also, Charles Hatfield was a "Rainmaker" whose stinky mix of chemicals may or may not have brought more rain to San Diego than ever before. Things did not go as planned.

30m
Mar 30
Underwear Chronicles Five: Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln wore some pretty plain underwear. We know because they made a few "surprise appearances." NEWSFLASH: The Underwear Chronicles are gonna be a book nd our Kickstarter is open through March of 2022. Jump on it, if you like the Underwear Chronicles!

16m
Mar 14
Episode 65: Samuel And J.C.

The year 1913 saw the births of two incredible Black Americans. One was Samuel Wilbert Tucker, a Civil Rights pioneer and all-around incredible person. The other was James Cleveland Owens, who came to be known as Jesse. A few years before Samuel arranged for one of the first Civil Rights sit-ins in history, Jesse broke five atheletic World Records, just days after badly injuring his back in a fall down the stairs.

30m
Feb 28
Underwear Chronicles Four: Satchel Paige

Satchel Paige went from burlap hand-me-downs to silk patterned boxers. Along the way we came one of the most dynamic baseball players in history.

16m
Feb 16
Episode 64: Oh, So Many Birds!

Eugene Schieffelin filled American skies with Starlings, who replaced the Passenger Pigeons that once (literally) darkened the skies. John James Audubon's obsession helped him create a very expensive book. This episode is about birds, and a whole lot more. Featuring Greg and Abigail Maupin, Mick Sullivan and that's about it.

32m
Jan 30
Underwear Chronicles Three: Buster Keaton

Buster Keaton could take a fall like no one else, and that skill carried him from the Vaudeville stages to the movie screen. He made people laugh, dazzled them with stunts, and fought a fire in his undies.

17m
Jan 18
Episode 63: More Accidents, More Toys

Chance has given us some great toys. Explore the accident that led to Silly Putty, the chance repurposing that led to Silly Putty, a few men who stumbled upon them, and two women who figured out what the substances should really be used for. This episode sponsored by RUBBER!

25m
Dec 29, 2021
Underwear Chronicles Two: Marie Antoinette

The famed Queen of France had several run-ins with underwear. She also had run-ins with smallpox, ladies-in-waiting, an awkward young prince, catty couriers, and ultimately, the guillotine. If nothing else, this episode will help you appreciate your privacy.

18m
Dec 15, 2021
Episode 62: Chance Encounters

Train stations are busy places and two notable men had very remarkable (and dramatic)encounters in stations during the 1860s. Thomas Edison met a mentor, and Robert Lincoln met a Shakespearean actor named Booth. Also features a You Have 30 Seconds segment on the Beale Papers and more!

28m
Nov 27, 2021
Underwear Chronicles 1: Up, Up, and Away With Their Clothes

Jean-Pierre Blanchard (1753-1809) and John Jeffries (1744-1819) Aeronauts, International Record Setters, Nearly Naked Travelers In the first release from our monthly true tale of underwear history, we meet two early aeronauts who became the first to fly internationally. And the first to fly internationally in their underwear.

18m
Nov 15, 2021
Episode 61: A Queen and Some Witches

Marina Raskova set world flying records, survived an epic plane crash, and was a trailblazer for generations of female pilots in Russia. With her help, The Night Witches became the most feared fliers of World War 2. Adelaide Herrmann was The Queen of Magic. Both with her husband Alexander and on her own, she amazed audiences with a special kind of magic. Featuring the voices of Greg and Abigail Maupin. All music, writing, production by Mick Sullivan,

31m
Oct 28, 2021
Episode 60 Big Ideas: Professor TSC Lowe and John Cleves Symmes Jr

Professor TSC Lowe (who was not a professor at all) had visions for a transatlantic balloon flight. He never succeeded in that but he did wind up as the Chief Aeronaut of the Balloon Corps during the American Civil War. His vision laid the ground work for Ferdinand Von Zeppelin’s later accomplishments. John Cleves Symmes Jr. popularized a theory known as the Hollow Earth Theory. He believed that the earth was hollow and contained other habitable worlds. Was he right? He was worse than right. He was wrong. All music, as usual, by Mick Sullivan. The writing and voices too.

33m
Sep 29, 2021
Episode 59: Safety with Books

The 1939 World's Fair brought a special visitor from England: an original copy of Magna Carta, but with World War II in full swing, America couldn't send it back. So the had to babysit the priceless document, which got more complicated than they expected. ALSO Marie Curie's books will not be safe to touch for another 1500 years, so librarians in Paris have to keep people safe from the documents. Learn about Marie, her discoveries, and plenty more in this episode!

30m
Aug 30, 2021
Episode 58 Origin Stories And Gold Medals

Origin stories, comic mis-starts, and medal-winning moments are highlighted in this episode featuring two unlikely international star athletes. Canada's Bobbie Rosenfeld overcame, among other things, small pox and very large pants to run her way into history - not just as an athlete, but a wonderful teammate. Muhammad Ali drank garlic water and chased the bus in his own pursuit of greatness. Spoiler alert: it worked.

32m
Jul 29, 2021
Bonus Episode! Knox Says Yes

Henry Knox is a name not many people know, but he was a pretty amazing bookseller turned soldier during the Revolutionary War. Released in honor of July 4th - but you can listen anywhere and anytime - still a good story about in interesting moment!

15m
Jul 03, 2021
Episode 57: On Horseback!

This episode tells the stories of Sibyl Ludington and Charley Willis. Sybil's well-known story is amazing, yet it lacks a lot of primary sources, and we use that as a way to introduce thinking about the past with a critical eye. No matter what Sibyl's story has inspired millions. Charley Willis was a cowboy, once enslaved in Texas, and who was impacted by the events of June 19th, or Juneteenth. After a lifetime on the trail, he left the world with one of the most well-known cowboy songs of all.

30m
Jun 28, 2021
Episode 56 Eugene And Django in Paris

Django Reinhardt was a Romani musician who, despite losing the use of two of his fingers was one of the most important musicians of his time. His contemporary and fellow Parisian was a man named Eugene Bullard. This American-born man would lead an unbelievable life as a boxer, musician, early black fighter pilot, and more.

33m
May 26, 2021
Episode 55 Telescopes And Stars

Edwin Hubble changed our view of the Solar System, but he was also a collegiate National Champion basketball player and high school coach. He also dealt with the struggles of freezing his face to a telescope. Anything for Science! George Ellery Hale had the idea for the largest telescope in history, and the American Public made it a reality during the Great Depression. It was actually made from something you might use in the kitchen.

31m
Apr 27, 2021
Episode 54: Gold!

Levi Strauss left his native Germany to escape discrimination, and then left New York for the opportunities of the American West. He lost some gold, but changed the world with his pants partnership. Ferminia Sarras was a miner from Nicaragua who didn't wear jeans, but rather a black taffeta dress (in the desert sun). Her successes were many, and they even named a town after her.

30m
Mar 26, 2021
Episode 53: Sophie And Willa

No one could have predicted that Sophie Blanchard would become France's leading aeronaut, but she flew higher than any woman before her. Willa Brown was the first Black woman to earn a pilot's license in America, but her accomplishments didn't end there. In many ways, she deserves credit for the famed Tuskegee Airmen. Also features Red Moon Road's song Sophie Blanchard 1778 (Official Aeronaut of the Empire and Restoration)

33m
Feb 24, 2021